Does Soy Measure Up?

We use research from the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health to grade the scientific evidence of soy's benefits.
Author:
Publish date:

Grade Key:

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use

A-Grade Recipients:
Dietary source of protein
To lower cholesterol

B-Grade Recipients:

Diarrhea in infants and young children

C-Grade Recipients:
Allergies (prevention of food allergies)
Antioxidant
Bowel/Intestinal disorders
Cancer (prevention and treatment)
Cardiovascular disease
Cognitive function
Crohn's disease
Cyclical breast pain
Diabetes
Exercise performance enhancement
Gallstones
Gastrointestinal motility
High blood pressure
Infantile colic
Inflammation
Iron deficiency anemia
Kidney disease
Menopausal symptoms
Menstrual migraine
Metabolic syndrome
Obesity/weight reduction
Osteoarthritis
Osteoporosis
Quality of life
Rheumatoid arthritis
Skin aging
Skin damage caused by the sun
Spinal cord injury
Thyroid disorders
Tuberculosis
Weight gain (infants)