Cannabinoid compounds in salmon. - Clean Eating Magazine

Cannabinoid Compounds in Salmon?

It turns out that your body can convert omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids into endocannabinoids – potentially disease-fighting versions of cannabinoid compounds.
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Crispy Citrus Salmon recipe

Crispy Citrus Salmon

Shut down your cannabis-espousing cousin Ted at the next family gathering with some study quoting of your own: There are other ways to get the benefits of marijuana without the smoke, according to research recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Researchers found that marijuana isn’t the only place where you can find cannabinoids, chemicals that bind to receptors in your body to fight pain and inflammation. It turns out that your body can convert omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids into endocannabinoids – potentially disease-fighting versions of cannabinoid compounds. Chronic inflammation has been associated with an increased risk of common diseases such as cancer and autoimmune diseases, and increasing the amount of omega fatty acids in your body (and therefore increasing endocannabinoids) could prevent its spread. “Inflammation in the body is a normal and healthy response to injury or attack,” says lead study author Aditi Das, PhD. “However, in disease states, there is chronic inflammation that needs to be resolved so that the body can repair itself.” The research, which was conducted on animal tissue, suggests that the intake of omega-rich foods such as nuts and fish can help ward off disease, though further human study must be conducted to make a solid link. Either way, don’t expect the same potency; the type of cannabinoids found in omegas lack any psychotropic effects, so feel free to mow down on chia seeds and go out for a Sunday drive.