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Gluten-Free

Caldo Tlalpeño

The origin stories of this famous soup are as varied as its ingredients, but while many people disagree on its origins, one thing is clear: This smoky, vegetable-packed soup is not to be missed.

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Tlalpan Borough, Mexico City

The origin stories of this famous soup are as varied as its ingredients. Did the Aztecs blend this hearty broth? Or, after excessive celebrations in his home in Tlalpan in the 1800s, did President Antonio López de Santa Ana ask his cook to create a dish to reinvigorate him — translation: heal his hangover? Or should the credit go to a street vendor located near a streetcar station in Tlalpan, now a borough in the south section of Mexico City? While many people disagree on its origins, one thing is clear: This smoky, vegetable-packed soup is not to be missed.

Eat the Rainbow

This recipe uses a variety of colorful produce, ensuring you get your fill of essential vitamins: Roma tomatoes are rich in lycopene, an antioxidant that protects skin from sun damage; avocados are full of potassium, which helps maintain healthy blood pressure levels; and carrots are rich in the vitamin A precursor beta-carotene, a nutrient essential for optimal eye health.

Servings
6
Prep Time
25 min
Duration
45 min

Ingredients

  • 2 7-oz boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 3 Roma tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • ½ small yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1 tbsp avocado oil or extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 carrots, halved lengthwise and cut into ¼-inch-thick slices
  • 2 cups green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup BPA-free canned chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2 canned chipotle chiles in adobo, cut into thin strips
  • 1 avocado, peeled, pitted and diced
  • 1 lime, cut into wedges

Preparation

  1. In a medium pot, place chicken and cover with water. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 15 minutes, until no longer pink inside. Transfer to a plate; reserve poaching liquid in pot. When cool enough to handle, shred chicken.
  2. To a blender, add tomatoes, onion and garlic and blend until smooth. In a medium skillet on medium, heat oil. Add blended ingredients and cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Return poaching liquid to a simmer on medium; season with salt. Add tomato mixture and simmer for 5 minutes. Add carrots, green beans and chickpeas and simmer for another 5 minutes. Add chipotle, along with any sauce, and simmer for 5 minutes more.
  4. Divide among bowls and top with chicken and avocado. Serve with lime wedges.

Nutrition Information

  • Serving Size 1/6 of recipe
  • Calories 222
  • Carbohydrate Content 16 g
  • Cholesterol Content 48 mg
  • Fat Content 10 g
  • Fiber Content 6 g
  • Protein Content 19 g
  • Saturated Fat Content 1 g
  • Sodium Content 463 mg
  • Sugar Content 5 g
  • Monounsaturated Fat Content 6 g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat Content 2 g